A Message from Maestro Vick

In 1981 when I began conducting the Greenville Chorale, little did I know then just what an important impact that experience would have in the cultural life of the upstate, and on my life – personally and professionally. As the Chorale has strengthened itself with stronger musicians, as our financial support has continued to increase, as our audience enthusiasm has grown, so too has my life been enriched with the friendship and dedication our singers have shared toward our common goal of great musical performances. More importantly, the fine arts musical culture of the upstate and beyond has grown and significantly enhanced the musical soul and spirit of our community.

Much has been said and written about music and the fine arts being an important part of our lives – not a “frill” but an essential part of the education of young people, and a positive factor in the continued strengthening of our inner selves as adults.

In 1981 when I began conducting the Greenville Chorale, little did I know then just what an important impact that experience would have in the cultural life of the upstate, and on my life – personally and professionally. As the Chorale has strengthened itself with stronger musicians, as our financial support has continued to increase, as our audience enthusiasm has grown, so too has my life been enriched with the friendship and dedication our singers have shared toward our common goal of great musical performances. More importantly, the fine arts musical culture of the upstate and beyond has grown and significantly enhanced the musical soul and spirit of our community.

Much has been said and written about music and the fine arts being an important part of our lives – not a “frill” but an essential part of the education of young people, and a positive factor in the continued strengthening of our inner selves as adults.

The great conductor Robert Shaw said it this way:

“Music is not a luxury but a necessity…because it is the persistent focus of man’s intelligence, aspiration and goodwill.”

Founded in 1961, for sixty-two years the Greenville Chorale has shared with our community that “aspiration and goodwill.”

Our 2022-2023 season brings back some of the great music the Chorale has performed in the past, and some new music with the Herring Ensemble winter concert. Few choral-orchestral works have evoked the joy and excitement and entertainment experience like CARMINA BURANA. The Vaughn Williams “Serenade to music” is pure beauty and insightful (Shakespearean) commentary on the importance of music in our life. “Gloria in excelsis Deo” is heard frequently at Christmas time. The setting by John Rutter brings out the full blossom and excitement of that text with brass and organ joining in. Chamber music and Brahms seem to go hand-in-hand, especially with the beautiful sound of the Herring Chamber Ensemble.

Finishing our season in April, we join with the Greenville Symphony Orchestra to help them celebrate two giant milestones: the GSO 75th Anniversary, and Maestro Tchivzhel’s 25th Anniversary as their conductor. The GSO and the Chorale have been great collaborators over the years. The impact of the sum of those two is far greater than the parts. Edvard Tchivzhel and I have been good friends and respected colleagues throughout his tenure in Greenville. He loves working with the Chorale, and the Chorale singers love performing for and with him and the GSO. We are honored to be a part of that weekend of the performance of Gustav Mahler’s impressive and deeply moving Symphony No. 2 “Resurrection Symphony.”

To all of our Chorale supporters – those who attend our performances and those who give generously to keep us strong financially – I share a big THANK YOU on behalf of the 150 voices of the Greenville Chorale, and especially its conductor. We look forward to seeing you at our concerts this coming season.

Cheers,